My Post-Election Sales Tip of the Day

I, like countless other Americans am glad that the 2016 presidential election is over!

(This is not a political post or an endorsement of the President-Elect. I’m a registered independent voter and voted for Gary Johnson since I couldn’t bring myself to vote for Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump.)

There are countless reasons and factors that determined the winner of the 2016 Presidential Election. Congrats winner: 50% of the country didn’t vote for you.

One of the main reasons I believe that Donald Trump won the presidency is this: He uncovered pain of the voters, addressed it and promised he’d fix it. There were many voters who felt they were forgotten and left behind by Washington, DC in this current economy. Fair or unfair, Trump continually magnified his voter’s “pain” and said he’d do something about it.

It remains to be seen if he will keep his promises and fix America’s “pain” but I digress.

How about you? When you’re reaching out to potential clients, do you simply throw up a bunch of features and benefits and hope something sticks?

Or do you uncover your sales prospects “pain”, probe deeper and magnify it and show how your solution will solve their pain?

If I have a splitting headache, I’ll do about anything to relieve that pain.

It’s the same with your sales prospects. Uncover their pain, address their pain and tell them specifically how you’re going to fix it, and they’ll “vote” with their budget.

Prospecting Targets: Ready, Fire, Aim?

In order to be successful at setting appointments via prospecting, cold calling, or sales calls, you must target well.

It doesn’t matter if you have the greatest steak recipe in the world, if you’re targeting vegetarians you probably won’t be too successful. Read more

2.7 Seconds To Capture Someone’s Attention?

“According to email provider ExactTarget, people take 2.7 seconds to decide if they will read, forward, or delete a message. These busy people sit with their finger on the delete button…” confirms Jill Konrath in The Ultimate Guide to Email Prospecting.

Yikes!

2.7 seconds! That’s it?

I guess I shouldn’t be surprised. I did some Internet research and experts guessed that we see an average of 3,000 ads per day. What if they are only half or a third right? 2,000 ads a day? 1,000 ads a day? Regardless, it’s a large number. Read more

How many appointments should a sales person have in 12 months?

The answer is of course, it depends!

I’ve interviewed candidates for Connect 5000 recently since we are slowly expanding and growing.

When I chat with sales candidates, I ask them how many sales calls were they required to make in their previous job. Their answer: 100 a day.

When I ask how much money do they want to make a year. Their answer: $100,000 a year.

There’s something about the number “100”. But I digress. Read more

Sales Reps Make Less than Two Call Attempts

Here are three interesting or depressing sales statistics whether you’re a CEO, Vice President of Sales, or sales representative surveying the sales landscape today.

According to RainToday.com, about 50% of sales people won’t prospect. That’s the research. Even worse, the percentage of consultants who won’t prospect is even higher.1

According to Insidesales.com, it takes between six and eight call attempts to reach a decision-maker. Their research also shows that most sales reps only make 1.7 call attempts to reach a new prospect2

Here’s the good news! In studying 4,658 actual business technology buyers, research organization Marketing Sherpa found that more than 50 percent admitted to short-listing a vendor after receiving a well-timed and relevant phone call. 3

At Connect 5000, we firmly believe and tell our clients and prospects that on average, it takes between seven and 10 touches to get your message to sink in. There’s a reason why Coca-Cola keeps playing commercials over and over on television.

The research clearly shows that sales reps make less than two call attempts and then give up. If you are looking for a firm to do the dirty work behind the scenes and make quality touches and calls, then we might be a good fit for you.

www.eyesonsales.com/content/article/6_keys_to_prospecting_success
2 www.insidesales.com/insider/dialer/4-sales-tips-for-making-contact-and-avoiding-prospect-badgering/
3 Art Sobczak, Smart Calling: Eliminate the Fear, Failure, and Rejection From Cold Calling (New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, 2010), p.10.

 

Sales Book Review: New Sales. Simplified.

Happy almost Labor Day!

My daughter was a flower girl in my wife’s cousin’s wedding recently. So my wife, daughter, and her parents flew out to LA to make it to the rehearsal in time. I flew out Friday evening to join them. I ordered Mike Weiberg’s book “New Sales. Simplifed.” on Amazon and took it on the plane with me.

Quick and easy read.

2 points that stood out for me personally: Read more

1/4 Inch Hole or 1/4 Inch Drill?

I came across 2 articles this week on selling with features and benefits instead of outcomes and results.

They used the same exact illustration: “Each and every year, millions of 1⁄4-inch drill bits are sold, yet nobody buying any one of these 1⁄4-inch drill bits actually wants a 1⁄4-inch drill bit. Then, why do they buy them? Because they want a 1⁄4-inch hole!” Read more

The Presidential Election and Sales Prospecting

I have some slightly bad news for you regarding the upcoming election in November:

No matter who wins the 2016 presidential election, unless your phone is ringing off the hook or you’re up to your ears in referrals, you are still going to need to be proactive and reach out to prospects by phone or in person.

You can’t control the weather. (See Hurricane Sandy!)

You can’t control the election. (Unless you’re a mega donor!)

You can’t control other companies. (Companies merge and get acquired all the time.)

You can’t control other executives. (Executives change jobs or get fired.)

Mark Cuban said best: “The only thing any entrepreneur, salesperson or anyone in any position can control is their effort.” Read more

Discounting: Respect yourself or else your prospects won’t!

Summer time is usually slow for us just like countless other organizations out there.

Last June, I was discussing our services with a prospect and he asked for a discount.

This post isn’t about whether or not should you discount, there’s strong arguments on both sides of the subject.

So here’s what the prospect and I agreed to: I gave him a 25% discount since it was our slow time as long as he signed the agreement by the end of the month. I wrote it clearly in the proposal that the discount was null and void by the certain date.

The deadline came and passed and I closed out his file.

Later on, I heard from my prospect out of the blue that they wanted to move forward and asked for the same discount.

I politely told them no. I wanted their business but didn’t need it. I was in a better negotiating position since things have picked up.

We discussed things and I agreed to give him a 12.5% discount rather than 25%. He wasn’t thrilled but I resent him the proposal with the new deadline in writing.

Guess what? He signed the agreement and we are good to go.

If you give in too quickly, in my opinion, I don’t believe the prospect will respect you. Your deadline and word is no longer good and they know if they push hard enough, you’ll give in.

Don’t!

If a girl meets a guy at a bar and gives in quickly by going home with him after the first night, the guy may not respect her.

Same way with your prospects. Stand your ground. Tell them no politely and professionally.

Respect yourself. If you don’t, the prospects won’t either.

How to blow an inbound sales call in 10 seconds

Happy 4th of July everyone!

Just like countless sales professionals, I use my cell phone as my main number to be reached out since I’m mobile and travel quite a bit to see clients and prospects.

On Thursday afternoon, I happened to get a call from Ontario, Canada.

Usually I answer the phone in some sort of variance of, “Good afternoon, this is Ray.”

I had just gotten an email via LinkedIn from a company in Canada and thought it was this company following up by phone so I answered “Hello?”.

He didn’t identify himself but started asking questions so I assumed it was a follow up sales call.

It wasn’t! It was a tech company who came across my website and was interested in my lead generation services.

Ouch!

I tried to explain this to the gentleman but no success and I wasn’t able to get the conversation on track.

2 takeaways:

1.  If you’re not ready to take a call for whatever reason, don’t answer it and let it go to voicemail. It should be obvious to me after doing this for 12 years, but we all make sales mistakes.

2. We all get inundated with calls and sometimes we don’t know if they’re personal or professional. Always err on the side of being friendly professional. This guy who I checked out on LinkedIn was part of a technology company which is in my target audience and I blew it.

There’s an old saying that you never get a second chance to make a first impression. How true!

Please don’t make the mistake I just made. It could literally cost you thousands of dollars in revenue.